5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

[h/t: generic-art]

It’s nice to hear something positive about autism instead of the negatives for a change. :)

(via thefrogman)

silversarcasm:

so-mashallah:

silversarcasm:

so-mashallah:

Shout out to parents with autistic or other challenged children. I really don’t think I’d be strong enough to do what y’all do. Huge props.

shout out to the actual fucking autistic people who deal with so much more shit than their parents and often face violence from their parents because of the rhetoric that we are difficult to deal with and you have to be ‘strong’ to see us as human

Lol shut up.

'parents of autistic people are so braavvvve'

'shut up autistic people i don't want to hear from you'

This is sadly so predictable.

(via a-spoon-is-born)

Inclusion and accessibility don’t go without saying

realsocialskills:

People don’t know that you will meet their access needs unless you tell them you will. Many people won’t, and people with disabilities can’t read your mind to figure out your intentions.

It goes a long way towards easing stress for everyone if you talk about access explicitly, rather than assuming it goes without saying that you will do the right thing.

For instance, if your store sign says “no dogs allowed” it should also say something like “except service dogs” (don’t say guide dogs specifically, because there are a lot of reasons other than blindness that some people have service animals)

  • This sends the message that you know service dogs exist
  • And that you’re not going to kick them out of the store for having a service dog
  • This does not go without saying; people with service dogs get illegally kicked out of stores all the time

Similarly, if you ban laptops/electronics, it’s important to say “except when they are needed by students with disabilities.” (and not to demand proof of diagnosis).

If you’re organizing a retreat and there is a rule against outside food, it’s important to either make an exception for people with dietary needs, or else work with people to provide them food they can eat. And to make it explicit that you will do this, because it very much does not go without saying.

If you’re advertising an event and it’s in an accessible venue (which it should be), put that information on the fliers (and make sure it’s true). That doesn’t go without saying. Many organizations whose values suggest that they should care about accessibility routinely hold events in completely inaccessible venues. No one will know that you’re doing it the right way unless you tell them. 

There are any number of other examples.

tl;dr: Keep in mind that people with disabilities can’t read your mind, and make it explicit that you will meet access needs, especially if your statements or rules suggest that you won’t.

This is outstanding. Thank you for writing it realsocialskills :)

I can’t count how many events I’ve skipped because they didn’t look accessible to me. I can’t count how many businesses have illegally kicked me out for having a service dog. I can’t count how many food events I’ve gone hungry at because there was nothing I could eat and outside food wasn’t allowed. I can’t count how many professors I’ve had to fight over needing my tablet in class WITH a formal accommodations letter to give them.

If you want to be inclusive, let us know. We’re used to not being included, so that’s the default expectation.

Things people with Social Anxiety do

high-energy-introvert:

•go to the bathroom to escape

•feel very uncomfortable without a phone or some other crutch

•dwell on a small awkward moment for much longer than necessary

•never go to any social event without a person that makes you feel comfortable

•follow said person way too much

•worry about the person beginning to find you obnoxious

•faking an illness to get out of a social event

•Dont buy something necessary because the cashier is intimidating. 

Reblogging my wife on this one :)

(via evilcactus)

tastefullyoffensive:

Smart phones are making us antisocial. [x]

Nope. People are always anti-social. Smart phones have just helped us aspies have a more normal existence. I can’t go back to not having one.

An aspie trying to join in on a running joke.

Sigh. This has been me so many times.

(via thefrogman)

He’s impossible to read.

How an aspie reacts to good and bad life events. I tend to only show emotions in private because they make me feel so awkward.

(via onlylolgifs)

rosalarian:

cubebreaker:

TurboRoo, a chihuahua born without its front legs, was given a 3D printed cart made by San Diego firm 3dyn so he could train to be a service dog for disabled children.

I think we could all use these pics today. Golly!

This just makes me melt and I had to share it <3

(via evilcactus)

I love this mental image.

&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-

This may be my last daily post for a while. I&#8217;m going to take a short break. I&#8217;m starting a new college and expecting a MAJOR work load. I&#8217;ll still make occasional posts as news comes up, or I find a cute picture, but it&#8217;s time for a vacation. I&#8217;ve been running this blog non-stop for over three years now.

I&#8217;ll be back soon. I love sharing with all my viewers. The kind messages keep me going :)

I love this mental image.

————-

This may be my last daily post for a while. I’m going to take a short break. I’m starting a new college and expecting a MAJOR work load. I’ll still make occasional posts as news comes up, or I find a cute picture, but it’s time for a vacation. I’ve been running this blog non-stop for over three years now.

I’ll be back soon. I love sharing with all my viewers. The kind messages keep me going :)

I enjoy the aspie perspective :)

I enjoy the aspie perspective :)

Sadly so true.

Sadly so true.

I&#8217;ve always used the single rider line at theme parks. Growing up in Florida, that means I&#8217;ve done it hundreds and hundreds of times. I&#8217;ve even gone to parks by myself because of lack of friends. If I saw this sign, I&#8217;d be so pissed. It&#8217;s straight up discrimination against people like us.

I’ve always used the single rider line at theme parks. Growing up in Florida, that means I’ve done it hundreds and hundreds of times. I’ve even gone to parks by myself because of lack of friends. If I saw this sign, I’d be so pissed. It’s straight up discrimination against people like us.

ultrafacts:

Source  [Click HERE to follow Ultrafacts]

Please realize this, people!

ultrafacts:

Source  [Click HERE to follow Ultrafacts]

Please realize this, people!

I just *LOVE* surprises. (/sarcasm)

I just *LOVE* surprises. (/sarcasm)

Story of my life. My wife doesn&#8217;t get this about me ;)

Story of my life. My wife doesn’t get this about me ;)