Do autistic people have superpowers?

iamautistic:

 

Love this gif answer :)

(via iamautistic)

jadeneternal:

My dad just passed away a few minutes ago. He was a seriously awesome and kind person. The fact he completely accepted me when I came out as autistic and then transgender shows the depth of his character and love.

I’m really going to miss him. The world won’t be the same now.

aspergersyndromefacts:

Since I’m sick as hell and I have no fact ready to post, I’m sharing this, it fits so well here.

This happens to me all too much.

aspergersyndromefacts:

Since I’m sick as hell and I have no fact ready to post, I’m sharing this, it fits so well here.

This happens to me all too much.

saxas:

GLORIFYING DISABILITY: In Between (2012)

In Between is a French short film about a woman living with anxiety, which takes the shape of a crocodile. (x)

(via rayvenloaf)

thelifeandliesofniamh:

aspergersissues:

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This reminds me of that incident where I met a girl who claimed she met me at a party and had an entire conversation with me, and I had no clue who she was. She knew my name, recited parts of the conversation and it did sound like me, and overall it did sound like the whole incident happened, except… I had no recollection of it whatsoever. Fun fact: I was completely sober at the party she talked about. (Side note: I have never had a black-out  ever in my life either; sober or in whatever way intoxicated.)
I think this incident will remain a mystery for the entire remainder of my life.

I’ve had that exact same thing happen multiple times. Don’t feel bad.

It really amazes me that on topics like Biology, My Little Pony, etc, I have near photographic memory. But when we’re talking about social interactions, I’m a blank slate. O_o

thelifeandliesofniamh:

aspergersissues:

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This reminds me of that incident where I met a girl who claimed she met me at a party and had an entire conversation with me, and I had no clue who she was. She knew my name, recited parts of the conversation and it did sound like me, and overall it did sound like the whole incident happened, except… I had no recollection of it whatsoever. Fun fact: I was completely sober at the party she talked about. (Side note: I have never had a black-out  ever in my life either; sober or in whatever way intoxicated.)

I think this incident will remain a mystery for the entire remainder of my life.

I’ve had that exact same thing happen multiple times. Don’t feel bad.

It really amazes me that on topics like Biology, My Little Pony, etc, I have near photographic memory. But when we’re talking about social interactions, I’m a blank slate. O_o

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

Children with autism become adults with autism. Too many parents tend to forget it. — (via floryann-k)
annavonsyfert:

heck yea I did

33 years and I still don’t know how to bottle it up. :\

annavonsyfert:

heck yea I did

33 years and I still don’t know how to bottle it up. :\

(via thefrogman)

When people act like being autistic isn’t difficult….

Media Representation

jadeneternal:

I had no one in the media when I was a child to look toward that felt like me. As time has gone by, though, I’ve started finding my on-screen role models.

I’ve found other autistics that teach me that I can still be a good, strong, caring, and well meaning individual like everyone else. Butters from South Park has taught me that I’m better than bullies. Michael Scott from The Office taught me that being good natured and caring will be appreciated in the long run. Drax from Guardians of the Galaxy taught me that my intense loyalty and drive toward a goal is valuable. When I didn’t have these examples, during high school, middle school, etc, I felt worthless and hopeless. I had no friends because I didn’t try. The only people who paid attention to me were bullies. It wasn’t until I saw my value through example that I was able to appreciate myself.

The same goes for transgender representation. Until Sophia on Orange is the New Black showed me that I really can just be another one of the girls, I let most of my female friends distance themselves eventually until we lost contact. When I started following Janet Mock in the news (not a fictional character obviously), I was able to come to grips with the fact that there really wasn’t anything wrong with me and it was okay to stop hiding. Sadly, transgender representation in media is still almost non-existent. I’m very lucky to have been given the courage to come out from what little I saw. I spent 33 years hiding it so deep that even my wife barely knew what was going on.

It’s important to see yourself in media. I really mourn for those still waiting. Movies, TV, and video games really have an obligation here. They’re getting better about it, but there is still a long way to go.

From my personal blog.

lamelohan:

*when someone you know walks up to you in public*

image

(via onlylolgifs)

Things people with Social Anxiety do

high-energy-introvert:

•go to the bathroom to escape

•feel very uncomfortable without a phone or some other crutch

•dwell on a small awkward moment for much longer than necessary

•never go to any social event without a person that makes you feel comfortable

•follow said person way too much

•worry about the person beginning to find you obnoxious

•faking an illness to get out of a social event

•Dont buy something necessary because the cashier is intimidating. 

Reblogging my wife on this one :)

(via evilcactus)

tastefullyoffensive:

Smart phones are making us antisocial. [x]

Nope. People are always anti-social. Smart phones have just helped us aspies have a more normal existence. I can’t go back to not having one.