solar-citrus:

You would be surprised with how many people in your life could be going through depression at this very moment.  People hide it like a paper bag over their heads out of fear of being judged, made fun of, seen as weak, or just not taken seriously.  Depression should not be taken lightly, it holds us down from our purpose and potential in life.  Those who tell you that it doesn’t exist have never experienced depression in their life, therefore not understanding the symptoms and how it’s something that cannot be fixed in a day!  So if you think you are depressed or if you think you know someone else who is, please talk to a friend, a family member, or anyone else in your life that you trust - never overlook the possibility of seeing a doctor for more professional help!!  Your feelings are real, your feelings are shared upon millions.  Don’t hide it, talk to someone about it.  With the right help, you can rediscover your confidence and begin life anew with our undying love and support!

We are right here!!

(via thefrogman)

myautisticpov:

I can’t quite explain how much I love Abed. ^^

This reads like an aspie moment to me, even though the aspie is the one explaining the truth to Troy ;)

(via onlylolgifs)

eatuntilyoudie:

sometimes i actually get my shit together but then i lose it again like 2 days later

Isn’t this the damned truth?

(via sherlocalypse-deactivated201409)

Inclusion and accessibility don’t go without saying

realsocialskills:

People don’t know that you will meet their access needs unless you tell them you will. Many people won’t, and people with disabilities can’t read your mind to figure out your intentions.

It goes a long way towards easing stress for everyone if you talk about access explicitly, rather than assuming it goes without saying that you will do the right thing.

For instance, if your store sign says “no dogs allowed” it should also say something like “except service dogs” (don’t say guide dogs specifically, because there are a lot of reasons other than blindness that some people have service animals)

  • This sends the message that you know service dogs exist
  • And that you’re not going to kick them out of the store for having a service dog
  • This does not go without saying; people with service dogs get illegally kicked out of stores all the time

Similarly, if you ban laptops/electronics, it’s important to say “except when they are needed by students with disabilities.” (and not to demand proof of diagnosis).

If you’re organizing a retreat and there is a rule against outside food, it’s important to either make an exception for people with dietary needs, or else work with people to provide them food they can eat. And to make it explicit that you will do this, because it very much does not go without saying.

If you’re advertising an event and it’s in an accessible venue (which it should be), put that information on the fliers (and make sure it’s true). That doesn’t go without saying. Many organizations whose values suggest that they should care about accessibility routinely hold events in completely inaccessible venues. No one will know that you’re doing it the right way unless you tell them. 

There are any number of other examples.

tl;dr: Keep in mind that people with disabilities can’t read your mind, and make it explicit that you will meet access needs, especially if your statements or rules suggest that you won’t.

This is outstanding. Thank you for writing it realsocialskills :)

I can’t count how many events I’ve skipped because they didn’t look accessible to me. I can’t count how many businesses have illegally kicked me out for having a service dog. I can’t count how many food events I’ve gone hungry at because there was nothing I could eat and outside food wasn’t allowed. I can’t count how many professors I’ve had to fight over needing my tablet in class WITH a formal accommodations letter to give them.

If you want to be inclusive, let us know. We’re used to not being included, so that’s the default expectation.

Do autistic people have superpowers?

iamautistic:

 

Love this gif answer :)

(via iamautistic)

jadeneternal:

My dad just passed away a few minutes ago. He was a seriously awesome and kind person. The fact he completely accepted me when I came out as autistic and then transgender shows the depth of his character and love.

I’m really going to miss him. The world won’t be the same now.

aspergersyndromefacts:

Since I’m sick as hell and I have no fact ready to post, I’m sharing this, it fits so well here.

This happens to me all too much.

aspergersyndromefacts:

Since I’m sick as hell and I have no fact ready to post, I’m sharing this, it fits so well here.

This happens to me all too much.

saxas:

GLORIFYING DISABILITY: In Between (2012)

In Between is a French short film about a woman living with anxiety, which takes the shape of a crocodile. (x)

(via rayvenloaf)

thelifeandliesofniamh:

aspergersissues:

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This reminds me of that incident where I met a girl who claimed she met me at a party and had an entire conversation with me, and I had no clue who she was. She knew my name, recited parts of the conversation and it did sound like me, and overall it did sound like the whole incident happened, except… I had no recollection of it whatsoever. Fun fact: I was completely sober at the party she talked about. (Side note: I have never had a black-out  ever in my life either; sober or in whatever way intoxicated.)
I think this incident will remain a mystery for the entire remainder of my life.

I’ve had that exact same thing happen multiple times. Don’t feel bad.

It really amazes me that on topics like Biology, My Little Pony, etc, I have near photographic memory. But when we’re talking about social interactions, I’m a blank slate. O_o

thelifeandliesofniamh:

aspergersissues:

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This reminds me of that incident where I met a girl who claimed she met me at a party and had an entire conversation with me, and I had no clue who she was. She knew my name, recited parts of the conversation and it did sound like me, and overall it did sound like the whole incident happened, except… I had no recollection of it whatsoever. Fun fact: I was completely sober at the party she talked about. (Side note: I have never had a black-out  ever in my life either; sober or in whatever way intoxicated.)

I think this incident will remain a mystery for the entire remainder of my life.

I’ve had that exact same thing happen multiple times. Don’t feel bad.

It really amazes me that on topics like Biology, My Little Pony, etc, I have near photographic memory. But when we’re talking about social interactions, I’m a blank slate. O_o

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

This happens to me all the goddamned time, especially at my new college.  Being face-blind sucks.

Children with autism become adults with autism. Too many parents tend to forget it. — (via floryann-k)