asker

Anonymous asked: if it actually has nothing to do with sensory stuff. and i've NEVER known what cognitive differences really meant. which leaves me zero for three goodbye never mind. help? i don't know, i mean don't actually help, this isn't your responsibility. i'm just confused. and upset by my confusion because my brain is not behaving well today.

youneedacat:

Usually when you hear sensory stuff described, you’ll hear about hypersensitivity and sometimes hyposensitivity.  But perceptual differences in autism go much deeper than that.  It can be something as simple as, autistic people are overall better at finding a rectangle hidden in a complex “distracting” figure than nonautistic people are, and that tells us something about autistic perception being different at the core.  There’s all sorts of little tests like that, that show serious differences between autistic and nonautistic perception, even when the autistic person themselves might not be aware of it.

Cognitive differences are differences in how we think compared to usual.  Temple Grandin talks about thinking in full-scale pictures that she can use to literally do entire blueprints in her mind and then model them as running machines that she can then troubleshoot… and that’s just one way that some autistic people have massive cognitive differences from the usual.  Some are to our advantage and some are not.  If you have trouble with language in any form, that’s a cognitive difference.  If you take things literally, that’s a cognitive difference.  If you are getting confused because the things I’m talking about are too abstract and I’m not being good enough at providing concrete examples, that’s a cognitive difference.  

Movement differences are more than just trouble moving your body or having motor coordination issues.  The following page has the easiest chart I’ve ever seen to describe movement differences in autistic people:

http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/?pageId=468

"Marked difficulties in {starting, stopping, executing, continuing, combining, switching} may impede {postures, actions, speech, thoughts, perceptions, emotions, memories}."

So that covers movement differences and cognitive differences as all sort of, part of the same overall pattern.  I have not met an autistic person who doesn’t have any of those troubles.

The problem is that when autistic people are taught about perceptual, cognitive, and movement differences, we’re taught in a way that simplifies them and pushes them off to the side.

We’re taught that the only perceptual differences autistic people have are hypersensitivities that make us overloaded sometimes.

We’re taught that the only cognitive differences we have are, sometimes, low IQ.

We’re taught that the only motor differences we have are coordination problems.

And then we’re let on our merry way and left to believe we don’t have any of these problems, when I’ve never met an autistic person who didn’t have significant differences from the norm in all three areas.  It’s just how we’ve been taught to view them that makes it confusing.  It’s the way people use words.

I’m going to stop now.  You seem overloaded (which would be a cognitive and possibly perceptual issue, if true) and I’m probably making it worse.  You don’t have to believe anything I say, if it makes it easier.  I’m just a random autistic person, my views aren’t better than yours.

Great post :)

sarahseeandersen:

Someone’s thigh touching my own thigh: my ultimate nightmare.

sarahseeandersen:

Someone’s thigh touching my own thigh: my ultimate nightmare.

tardiscrash:

Let’s be real, in a time before the internet people didn’t have more adventures and make more meaningful connections. They watched TV and listened to CDs. Before that they listened to records and read magazines. Before that they listened to the radio and read bad dime novels. Before that they embroidered or some shit.

People have been staying inside and ignoring other people for as long as there have been buildings. 

This is the damned truth. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise :)

(via a-spoon-is-born)

hotrodsparrow:

I NEED DIS!

I need dis, too.

hotrodsparrow:

I NEED DIS!

I need dis, too.

Your brain is not a democracy

realsocialskills:

Your brain is not a democracy.

You get to decide what you believe. You can think things that no one else agrees with. You can also like things no one else likes.

You can and must think for yourself.

For instance:

If someone calls you out for something, it’s important to listen to them, and to think through whether or not you think they are right.

If a teacher or therapist tells you that something is socially inappropriate, it’s important to think through whether or not you agree.

If everyone tells you that a TV show you like is awful, it is still ok for you to decide whether you like it

If everyone tells you that something you like isn’t age appropriate, it’s still ok for you to decide you like it.

Your thoughts and tastes are yours. You are the one who should decide what you like, believe, and spend time doing.

Beautiful points :)

rubyetc:

most people have a hard time accepting what they are going through is valid to begin with. Don’t add to that insecurity. 
By Ruby [tumblr | twitter | instagram]

rubyetc:

most people have a hard time accepting what they are going through is valid to begin with. Don’t add to that insecurity. 

By Ruby [tumblr | twitter | instagram]

(via thefrogman)

In about a week, I’ll be at BronyCon. I can’t wait! I’m also involved with ASAN.

I have to say, I’m really blown away that BronyCon has adapted this wonderful convention device that ASAN created/popularized (not sure which). I’m sure a high percentage of BronyCon attendees are on the spectrum, diagnosed or not, so this will be a big aid to them in keeping their anxiety in check.

This is my way of saying, “Thank you for being so inclusive, BronyCon. It’s an honor to attend your event.”

If you want more information about this news blurb, you can find it on Equestria Daily. If you want more info on BronyCon, you can get it on their official site.

Say hi if you see me there! I’ll be cosplaying Octavia (and you can’t miss my chin and hand tattoos) and my wife is coming as both Flufflepuff and Fluttershy.

In about a week, I’ll be at BronyCon. I can’t wait! I’m also involved with ASAN.

I have to say, I’m really blown away that BronyCon has adapted this wonderful convention device that ASAN created/popularized (not sure which). I’m sure a high percentage of BronyCon attendees are on the spectrum, diagnosed or not, so this will be a big aid to them in keeping their anxiety in check.

This is my way of saying, “Thank you for being so inclusive, BronyCon. It’s an honor to attend your event.”

If you want more information about this news blurb, you can find it on Equestria Daily. If you want more info on BronyCon, you can get it on their official site.

Say hi if you see me there! I’ll be cosplaying Octavia (and you can’t miss my chin and hand tattoos) and my wife is coming as both Flufflepuff and Fluttershy.

I am telling you now because I want you to stop telling girls and women with disabilities that we’re broken, that we need prayers, that we’re burdens, that it’s okay if someone hurts us because “they’re probably just stressed” from having to “deal” with us, or that we’re pretty “for a girl in a wheelchair.”

Stop Telling Me That I’m Pretty for a Girl in a Wheelchair: How Your Words Contribute to Violence Against Women with Disabilities

very powerful. please read the entire essay. tw for abuse and assault against women with disabilities. 

(via disabilityhistory)

(via a-spoon-is-born)

This is such an aspie response at the end! For those that’ll miss it, Will doesn’t realize “tall” is the euphemism they’re all using since they don’t want to say “white.”

(via hotrodsparrow)

tastefullyoffensive:

[fowllanguagecomics]

I’m really feeling connected to this comic series, lately ;)

tastefullyoffensive:

[fowllanguagecomics]

I’m really feeling connected to this comic series, lately ;)

twistmalchik:

Reminder that Autistic Hoya designed these emergency disclosure cards. They’re free to print out.
PDF

twistmalchik:

Reminder that Autistic Hoya designed these emergency disclosure cards. They’re free to print out.

PDF

(via ananiujitha)

best-of-imgur:

"With some dogs you just look at them…" Eckhart Tolle [858x536]http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

best-of-imgur:

"With some dogs you just look at them…" Eckhart Tolle [858x536]
http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

Sorry this is late. April was not a good month for me.

pensiveaspie:

After a lifetime of failing to be normal, I finally realized I excel at being an Aspie.

This is what my diagnosis at 25 felt like.

pensiveaspie:

After a lifetime of failing to be normal, I finally realized I excel at being an Aspie.

This is what my diagnosis at 25 felt like.

More on names from a very funny comic.

More on names from a very funny comic.